The Contributor’s Corner @JoyGerken @RRBC_Org #RRBC

Welcome to THE CONTRIBUTOR’S CORNER! This month’s post is by contributing Author, JOY M, LILLEY!

(SPECIAL NOTE:  Although some people, like our contributing writer this month, Author, Joy M. Lilley, who resides in the UK, revered the Queen, there are many who do not share that sentiment.  So, although we are sharing Joy’s post and her right to write about whatever she wants, we are in no way ignoring the other side who have gravely different feelings for this woman many called their Queen.  Click to read “QUEEN ELIZABETH’S DEATH REVIVES CRITICISM OF BRITAIN’S LEGACY OF COLONIALISM.”)

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“REST IN PEACE, OUR QUEEN”

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I want to share with my American friends, my deep sadness of the death of our Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, on 8th September 2022.

An early memory that I have of this splendid lady, was when as a schoolgirl, aged eight years old, we were all marched up to a street in Folkestone, to see the Queen returning from a trip abroad by boat.

As she sat in her open carriage waving to us kids, I well recall how beautiful this young woman looked, with her perfectly applied make-up and lustrous outfit. I cannot remember who was with her.

In later life, I was asked if I would be prepared to go to one of the Royal Garden parties, held each year for those who had given service to the community. It was my nursing role that would have afforded me this honour. I went through the vetting process, being asked such questions as, “Did I have any I.R.A. connections?” and other pertinent questions.

I always maintained that I was paid for the job I performed, therefore, I was no more deserving than the next individual who also served others. Anyway, I purchased an outfit in readiness for the trip – one that I can still get into thirty years later. In the end, I was not to be the nurse selected to go to Buckingham Palace.  I did not mind as I was delighted for the girl who was chosen.  She was a close colleague of mine.

Tonight, I think about how much I would have loved to have seen this amazing Mother, Grandmother, Great Grandmother and our Queen, up close.

R.I.P. H.R.H. QUEEN ELIZABETH II

~ Joy M. Lilley

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To learn more about Joy, please visit her RRBC Author Page!

 If you would like to be a contributor here, please submit your written pieces for consideration to RRBCInfo@gmail.com!

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182 comments

  1. I’m sorry that you’ve loved and lost people to breast cancer. I had a scare once, but I was fortunate that it was benign. I complete self-examinations often, and I get a thermography every year. The more awareness we bring to the subject (and the ease to which we have these conversations) can help save lives, so thank you for starting the conversation, Pat. 🙂

    Like

    • Good Morning Yvette,
      Thank you. Moni was a fantastic woman. Her school kids loved her and at her funeral there was not a dry eye that stood by among her colleagues. Outside of that, she was an outstanding musician and I was proud to stand with her on stage.
      Yes, the more awareness we have the more it helps. Checking our breast is a necessity. It is something that we all should do.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Pat, so many needed to hear this! Thanks for putting this together for us.

    Let’s all get our annual exams. It truly is a matter of life and death.

    Now, back to that video that no one has commented on. IT IS THE ABSOLUTE BEST! #MyFavoriteMovie

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  3. Pat, thank you for your insight and perspective. Breast Cancer is one of the worst statements from a doctor. Following your guiance can provide early detection and treatments. It is an important issue.

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  4. Pat, love your summary of the booths and the event. Nonnie knocked my socks off. It was well done and a valuable event to return to time and again.

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  5. I liked your perspective on voice, Pat. It is good advice. I think our voice changes to a degree with age and circumstances, is that fair to suggest?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I feel very connected to my writing voice. I have strong voices in my head, and I’m an empath, so when a character presents him/herself to me, I connect very quickly to his/her essence. And my narrative voice stayed the same through my series. With my newest book, my narrative voice shifted to fit the genre. Hopefully, it will resonate well when released. Great article, Pat! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hi Yvette,
      Thank you for dropping by and chiming in. I too am very close to my characters and the voices in my head. Their tones of voice, choice of words are significant to each character. So I understand you very well.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Pat, this is profound. A writer’s voice is what makes their work unique and gives them the ability to find their characters’ voices. You’ve put words to the creative heart of writing. Beautiful article. Thank you!

    Blessings!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Karen,
      I do believe a writer can branch out and learn how to write in other genres, but in order for it to come across as convincing it has to come from the voice of the author and that is from the heart. I believe through reading broadly across the entire literature field we strengthen our voice because we learn a little bit about ourselves. Then as you say, we write out of a knowing and not out of just research.
      Thank you for coming in and adding to the discussion. I really appreciate it.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

  8. What a piece, Pat! It is very profound.

    Freedom! It certainly isn’t what some of us thought it was especially with what is happening in the U.S.

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

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    • Thank you, Yvette and Amen! Democracy is messy and ugly at times. But I agree, and say we should all look at what is going on in the world. It would make us appreciate the freedom that we have.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Rox. It is nice having a pleasant exchange of thought. So many people forget what independence really mean. They have forgotten that it is a privilege that others paid the price for.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  9. Hi Pat. This is very deep and moving. I especially liked your excerpt from the Declaration of Independence. May our country always line up with those powerful words. We are created equal. Thank you, Pat!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you, Patty. My hope is that everyone in the U.S. can acknowledge how precious it is to live in a democracy where your words are not forbidden. Books can be read without worrying about the person being arrested. It is indeed, even with its mistakes, the greatest and the most blessed country in the world.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  10. Wow, Pat! Thank you for sharing your Dad with us. What a picture of loving strength and perseverance. And look how beautifully you turned out! He certainly earned his “Well done” welcome home.

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    • Hi Patty,
      Yes, I agree. My Dad did well done job. It is strange that we don’t realize the immensity of having a dad in our lives, regardless of whether it is a father, uncle, or a next door neighbor that took the time to give us true north principles, until they are no longer among us. Sure, we love them, but the recognition of what they did in our lives comes in slices. I had the privilege of my father laying hands on my head and blessing me. That and a few other moments with him had ingrained themselves in my life.
      Thank you for stopping by. Enjoy THE PIPELINE.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  11. What a beautiful tribute to your father, Pat! My father got his AA through his time in the military. He was insistent that I would go to college and that I would do so through a scholarship. He would sit with me through elementary and middle school when I needed help. I did earn that scholarship, and he celebrated every degree I earned (I have three of them) because I was the first person in his lineage to earn them. But it wasn’t just a love for knowledge that he instilled in me; it was also a love for adventure. Growing up as an Army brat embedded in me a desire to explore unseen lands, and to this day, my parents and I (and my son) take summer road trips to see places we have yet to experience. Dads are pretty great. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Yvette,
      Yes, Dads are something special. I am happy that you can still enjoy these special moments with your Dad. Since this article, I have often thought about those last years that my Dad was here on earth. I went home often and he and I would spend time together. He would take me everywhere to see his friends. He was so proud of me. I am so thankful that I had the privilege to discover how precious my dad was while he lived and could show him, my love.
      Take care and thank you for supporting THE PIPELINE by reading and commenting. You’re a champion!
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, My Dear Bette. It was such a lovely experience to look back and see my father and all that he did for me in a newer light because my eyes have sharpened at just how good he was.
      Take care my dear friend, and thanks for all the support that you give us here at THE PIPELINE. Because of members like you, we do our best to ensure that our literary magazine is magnificent.

      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  12. Dear Pat, what wonderful memories you have of your father. The love felt between a father and daughter is remarkable. Mine wished for me to become a concert pianist, that was his dream; I didn’t I became a nurse instead. He was so proud of my achievements within the nursing profession, I think he forgot his dream.
    I cannot imagine the difficulties you and your family endured in the sixties America. But you did overcome and succeeded in life’s travels. Good for you and yours ! Blessings.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Pat I love that you share your father and his goals for you. It speaks to your character that you took advantage of that support rather than push back as many younger people do. It would be interesting to create a book of positive-role-model father stories. I bet we all have some memories of support and hope that we received from our fathers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Rox,
      Thank you. When I look back, I see how much my father’s life had to do with me develolping the character traits that are with me. He was indeed a great guy and I am happy that I saw that a few years before he died and could enjoy and celebrate with my dad.
      Shalom aleichem

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  14. Hi Pat, this really is such a lovely post. Your father sounds like a wonderful and supportive father. My sister and I were also the first in our family to receive university degrees. My mother’s father did not believe in educating women and would not buy her the uniform when she won entry into a grammar school. My [step] father was dyslexic and was badly treated by the teachers who thought he was lazy and stupid.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Robbie. Then you know how it feels to be the first in the family to make a parent’s dream come true. I love the poetry from William Wordsworth and in one poem he said, The Child is the father of man. I have always interpreted that as keeping the child alive in your heart. Which means the dream in your father’s heart was kept alive until you and your sister fulfilled it.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Pat, what a great story. My father only made it to fourth grade but he managed to take care of us well. Unfortunately, he was plagued with the sin of racism too. I know it sounds like a broken record, but it’s all real and we suffered the effects of what my dad went through.

    White supremacy is making its last stand today because those who perpetrate the big lie know that time is running out for their grip on the country and canceling this horrendous culture is about to happen. Then we won’t have to talk about it anymore.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Shirley. Taking care of his family was so important to my father. That’s one of the reasons he didn’t leave to go to work up North. He refused to leave his family behind. So it makes me so happy to know that your father took care of his family, even though he was plague with racism in Detroit. Those of us in the Deep South always thought it was much better in the North.

      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  16. As someone who lives with an anxiety disorder and has OCD tendencies, I understand the level of strength someone with a mental health issue must have to appear “normal” to others. I am surrounded by people who have issues and struggles of their own. Judgment has never helped anyone. We need more people who embrace compassion and empathy and patience and love. 🙂

    Like

  17. Hi Nonnie, this is a great piece of writing. I am deeply sympathetic to people who suffer from mental health issues. My own child is OCD and it runs in my family so I am very familiar with the extreme difficulties faced by sufferers. I also see depression impacting on colleagues and friends and know how hard it is to pull yourself out of that black hole of despair. I thank God I am by nature a positive and upbeat person and am able to counsel others in this regard.

    Like

  18. Nothing beats a story like this. This is what makes a great teacher when stude\nts return later in life to thank their teacher. As a teacher myself my children, I call them children, have never stopped sending me love.

    Like

  19. What beautiful memories to share, John! I know things like this are what keep teachers in the trenches when it seems you aren’t making any impact at all. This post is proof of the influence you had on students’ lives that might have turned out differently if they’d not had you for a teacher! Well-done!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Jan! I do cherish memories like these, and I cringe at some other not so pleasant memories also documented in the book. You are totally right that most teachers in the classroom don’t really know if they are impacting on the lives of their students… but they live in hope and that’s what gets them up in the morning! Thanks to Nonnie for honouring me like this in this month’s Pipeline Magazine!

      Like

  20. I just got around to checking out Jan’s Tarot Tuesday. I love it! I enjoy that it makes one reflect upon their day/week/month/life and find purpose or meaning. Plus, it’s interesting and fun. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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