The Contributor’s Corner @NonnieJules @RRBC_Org @RRBC_RWISA @Tweets4RWISA #RRBC #RWISA

Welcome to THE CONTRIBUTOR’S CORNER! This month’s post is by contributing RWISA Author, NONNIE JULES!

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“EVERY LITTLE BIT COUNTS”

Untitled design (9)

There are times when our muse just doesn’t want to cooperate.  No matter how badly we want to write, or how desperately we need to write, she’s not interested.  She turns her back on us, and trolls the avenues, leaving us confused, frustrated, and sad.  I will admit, there have been times when she has left me angry as heck!

Some of us feel that if we can’t sit down and write a full-length novel, we shouldn’t bother writing at all.  Or, if we can’t get a short story together, all is lost.  But you’re a writer, and your need to write is truly part of your DNA.  And, you need to keep feeding the beast so that you’re not forgotten, right?  But, how do you do it when it’s just not in you?

If you can remember that every bit of writing counts – even the little things, this will no longer be your issue.  Whenever we put pen to paper or sit down and our fingers caress those keys on our computer, we have the innate ability to make magic, and when we continuously exercise that magic muscle, we are honing our writing skills in the process.

This is why every writer should have a blog and should stick to a regular blogging schedule.  When you put together those little blog posts, if you’re of the true writer mindset, you’re growing with every post; and each one should be better than the last.

If you sometimes happen upon short writing contests, enter them.  Although you might not win the prize they are awarding, your skill and technique are improving with each entry.  This is why there is a constant stream of writing contests and writing showcase tours found within RRBC and RWISAWe like to see growth in our writers, so we create those avenues that enable them to continually write, all while flourishing.

I enjoy reading the writing sections here in THE PIPELINE that features writing pieces by Karen Black and Pat Garcia, and the writing found in AT HOME WITH HARRIET.  With each piece that they produce, I see new writing growth and it gets me so excited for their upcoming releases, and also, their latest books that I haven’t even read yet!  They are already fantastic storytellers, so can you imagine how much they grow every time they pen something new?

So, here’s my tip:  don’t worry if right now you can’t pen that full-length novel.  If it’s already in the works, that’s great, but if it isn’t, just begin writing… anything.  Start a daily online journal – you don’t have to make it public.  Ask your friends if you can guest post on their blogs, and ensure that your own blog is on a regular delivery schedule so that your followers won’t forget that you’re still around.  Go on a few blog tours where you might have to write a different blog post for each day of the tour. There are so many ways for you to continually work on getting better.  And in this business, that is something we should strive for every day.

I didn’t have to write this post for this issue, but I did… because I realize that I’m growing with every word I write.

When you can’t push out something big, always remember that every little bit counts, even the little pieces!  

~ Nonnie Jules

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To learn more about Nonnie please visit her RRBC Author Page!

 If you would like to be a contributor here, please submit your written pieces for consideration to RRBCInfo@gmail.com!

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180 comments

  1. Thanks for your encouraging article, Nonnie. When I haven’t been able to write something in my work-in-progress for awhile, I find myself writing lengthy responses to simple questions in emails because the writer must WRITE, even if the recipient might think the response is over the top. When the muse doesn’t show up, there are plenty of ways to exercise those writing muscles.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Your encouraging article is absolutely correct, Nonnie. The key to writing success is quality, not quantity. As with most things, it takes practice. Learning to create short pieces of increasing quality will lead to that novel, if writing one is the ultimate goal. It also helps to have a mentor, who is willing to be brutally honest…

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Good Morning, Nonnie,
    Having been in situations in the last few months where it was difficult to sit down and tap words into my computer, this is another one of your timely articles. Sometimes writing in your journal or just picking up a few books to read will calm your muse and get you back to writing.
    Shalom aleichem

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Marian,

      Just chiming in to say I love your response. It burns twice as bright. As I was snooping happily through Nonnie’s blog, I saw this article and to be honest, I read it several times because what she said resonated with the way I look at my heart and my generosity toward others. I believe we should repeat this article every year to see if we are living from a generous heart.

      Thank you so much for dropping by.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  4. Great article, Nonnie! And a great find, Pat. If we could all remember that we all bleed red, then what we think of as differences would only give us more to admire about each other. It all boils down to the Golden Rule, doesn’t it? Treat others the way you would like them to treat you. Not necessarily HOW they treat you. Be a blessing!

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Great find, Pat! And great post, Nonnie! I don’t really have conversations on Twitter. Honestly, I just don’t have time for that. Lol! I do follow a couple of celebrities on FB and IG. Two are authors I absolutely love and enjoy hearing them talk about their upcoming books and their writing life. One is an actor who is also hyper-focused on saving the planet. And another is a singing duet whose music just calms me. I don’t really interact with any of them (again, don’t have time for all that), but when a post crosses my screen, I’ll take a moment to smile and move along. I’ve met a few famous people in my lifetime. Some are jerks; some are real nice. But like Nonnie said, they all bleed red. They are regular people with flaws, just like the rest of us. They may have money and fame, but that does not mean their life is perfect. So, like Nonnie, I don’t bat an eye at someone’s celebrity status. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi Yvette,
      I so relate to what you’ve said. People forget that we all die and none of what we think is important will we be able to take with us. You stand before God empty handed.
      Thank you for dropping by.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

    • Right on, Yvette! Same. They’re just people, just like us. My daughters have photos with some of the biggest celebs in the business (you run into everyone in LA and in the airport, don’t you?) But, while we’re on the topic of celebs, the most beautiful souls we’ve ever met were Ben Stiller’s parents, Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara. They behaved just as they were, regular people.

      Thanks, Yvette!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Good Morning, Karen,
      Yes, so many points well taken, and to think that you and I get a chance to read the Contributor’s Corner before anyone else does. We are indeed blessed.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Good Morning, Madam President,
    I love this article. I don’t know how many times I read it because I didn’t count them. But, one of the things that stood out is something I truly believe, and that is that the pie is huge enough for everyone to get a big slice, and there is still half of the pie left over.
    I have seen you live what you say since I have been a part of RRBC. You are an example for me of what success really is.
    Take care.
    Shalom aleichem

    Liked by 2 people

  7. HI Pat and Nonnie, thank you for this wonderful post. Thankfully, I am not a jealous person and I am grateful because jealously causes so much harm in the world. Like all people, I have my failings and one of the main ones is that I am not very patient with others. I am always busy and rushing about and having to be patient and re-explain things slows me down so I’m not very good at it. I am working hard at acceptance as that leads automatically to more patience with everything in life.

    Like

  8. My mantra is to be better today than I was yesterday. Most of my work is focused on my anxiety and ruminating thoughts. I do my best to always treat others with kindness and compassion; I just have difficulty sometimes treating myself that way. I’m evolving and growing stronger day by day. Great post, Nonnie! I’m happy Pat gave it new life. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Good Morning, Yvette,

      May I say that you aren‘t the only that has a difficult time in treating yourself with kindness and compassion. May I join that club? Because I am harder on myself than I am on anyone else. Someone whom I admire told me a long time ago that I needed to learn to be gentle with myself. She was right, and I say that learning that is an ongoing lesson that you have to practice everyday.

      As for digging into Nonnie‘s blogs, well, that is my pleasure. I always come out of her blogs wiser.

      Thanks for coming by and have a lovely day.

      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 2 people

    • Good Morning, John,
      Thank you. I so enjoy digging through Nonnie’s blog. Sometimes, it takes me a day or two to decide on one article because I get caught up in her blog posts. I learned a lot.

      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

  9. This is a good one, Nonnie and worth revisiting. We are all works in progress, and we’re all flawed in some way. I loved the example you used. I was hyper critical of people and was able to slowly change when I realized that the things I was most critical about were the exact things I hated about myself. As I worked on those areas, I found compassion for others. The work was difficult, but so rewarding. Not all the way there, yet, but that’ll be true until I graduate to Heaven, I’m afraid.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good Morning, Patty,
      That’s one of the things I appreciate about this article. It’s age old wisdom that stems right from the Bible but it is dressed up in a modern way. Nonnie is good at bringing the wisdom in the Bible up to the modern standard so that we can understand it, and yet it doesn’t demote the Bible; it promotes it..
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 1 person

    • Good Morning, Karen,
      Yes, indeed. Nonnie has so much great information in her blogs that she could write a book for writers. We could use a few honest writers’ books on the market instead of all these get quick success books for writers that hardly ever work.
      Shalom aleichem

      Liked by 2 people

  10. The breakdown of relationships are terrible, Nonnie. You have certainly captured the confusion and emotion of a fight or break up in your poem. I have a very stable relationship, and it has been many years since I experienced this heady ups and downs.

    Like

  11. Beautiful picture, Nonnie. Love makes us and breaks us, but it doesn’t leave us broken if we allow the light of love to shine through the broken places. The Japanese have a lovely symbolic way of illustrating it called Kintsugi. They use gold to put broken pottery pieces back together. May God mend all broken hearts with His love.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Patty! I am so tickled that your comment was in reference to the photo. The poem was behind the “linked” title above but since a couple of readers so innocently missed that, I’ve decided to just pull the poem here from my site.

      Thank you for dropping in, and yes, may God mend all broken hearts with His love!

      Take care, Patty!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m so glad I revisited this page, Nonnie! I love the poem, and I’ve experienced that heartbreak.You described the pain so well. Looking back, I’m thankful the one I yearned for did NOT come back! I would have missed the real love of my life!

        Like

  12. I love this picture. Love is a precious and funny thing. The heart wants what the heart wants, it is disconnected from the brain and helps accentuate the feelings and emotions that make your physical being soar. Thank you

    Like

  13. Nonnie, A Home for the Holidays is what we should all be grateful for and what we should cherish. Thank you for keeping others in your heart this holiday season and inserting them into ours.

    Like

  14. What a thoughtful poem, Nonnie! We have a few homeless students at my school. Many times, people think of the panhandlers on the street when they think of the homeless concept, but there are families who sleep in a car or who stay one night with one relative and then a few nights with another relative, constantly moving. The instability creates insecurity and fear in the children. Thank you for shining a light on this population. 🙂

    Like

  15. Good morning, Nonnie. Your poem is one to make us think and reflect on what each of us miight do as a positive impact in our own community. Like with throwing a pebble in the water, the impact can ever widen and gain circles of support. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Good Morning Nonnie,
    Yes, when I see the people in refugee camps all over the world, sitting behind barbwire fences, children standing before them, cold, hungry and barefoot, I see individuals looking for a home. Thanks for this poignant poem about the misery of our present day world. These are the human beings that we tend to forget.
    Shalom aleichem

    Like

  17. Pat, thank you for reminding us that breast cancer is a terrible disease and that there are treatments if it’s caught early. I’m so sorry about the loss of your loved ones. They sound like amazing people.

    Blessings,
    Patty

    Like

  18. HI Pat, thank you for sharing this important post. My mother is a breast cancer survivor and she has/d the genetic HR2 cancer so all of her four daughters are high risk. We all go for mammograms every year and, for me, every year the doctors are all worried and do a whole bunch of extra tests. Luckily, so far the tests have all been fine but it is a disconcerting experience.

    Like

    • Good Afternoon Robbie,
      Yes, that is a disconcerting experience. I am very happy that your mom is a survivor and that you and your sisters go for a mammogram every year. I have my next mammogram coming up soon. Will I go? Yes, I will. Thank you so much for sharing.
      Have a great day and I hope Michael is doing well.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

  19. I’m sorry for your loss, Pat. I, too, have lost young relatives to Breast Cancer. The latest was my 59 YO cousin who had a double omentectomy five years ago and was claimed cancer-free a year later. However, a cancerous cell had found a good hiding place and killed her in her sleep without any advanced warning last fall.

    Like

      • John, don’t worry about it. I can’t count the times the computer corrects things that I write. The bad thing is that my left eye is weak and I don’t see the changes, especially when my eyes are tired.
        Shalom aleichem

        Like

    • Good Morning John,
      Reading your comment hurt. I am sorry for your loss. I know your family was devastated. My friend Moni was an only child and her mother and father are still dealing with the loss after three years. To say that she was a wonderful person doesn’t describe her completely. The good and bad times that we had went beyond race or colour. Somehow we were transformed and nothing else mattered except our sisterly relationship with each other. Her parents were astonished at our closeness.
      Thank you so much for dropping by and sharing your story.
      Shalom aleichem

      Like

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